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Julie Bull Passionate + Visionary + Change-Maker

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“Integrating Indigenous Knowledge”

Julie Bull’s presentations educate and inspire her audience with the message of reconciliation, health, leadership, and empowerment. Her wealth of expertise in the fields of Indigenous research, education, ethics, and indigenization, are part of the reason she is a highly sought-after speaker in Canada and around the world. Recipient of Canada’s most prestigious doctoral award, Julie Bull is an Award-Winning Indigenous Scholar with over 15 years’ experience in community-based research, involving Indigenous people.

Julie Bull is an of mixed Inuit descent and is a member of NunatuKavut, Labrador. Julie teaches in the Aboriginal Studies Program at the University of Victoria and is an invited lecturer and speaker at many events throughout Canada and around the world. She is also an event manager for Diverse (Indigenous) Talents where she works with Scott Ward and Dakota House, and is an ethics policy consultant for the Native Council of Prince Edward Island. Her academic background is interdisciplinary with a specific focus on research methods and ethics for research involving Indigenous people. Among Julie’s many awards and accolades are Canada’s most prestigious doctoral award, the Vanier Graduate Scholarship and the National Aboriginal Role Model Award from the National Aboriginal Health Organization in recognition of her leadership within Indigenous grassroots communities. She also received the Jens Peder Hanson Memorial Fellowship Award, given to outstanding researchers in the circumpolar north.

Julie is active in both academic and grassroots Indigenous initiatives and sits on national committees working in the area of Aboriginal health research and research ethics, such as the Secretariat on Responsible Conduct of Research. She remains connected to her home community in Labrador by sitting on the NunatuKavut Community Council Research Advisory Committee and continuing to facilitate relationships between that community and academic researchers. She is also a mentor in the Indigenous Women in Community Leadership through the Coady International Institute at St. FX University.

In 2015, Julie was a keynote speaker at International Research Ethics conference in New Zealand, sat on a planning committee for an International conference in Japan where she also presented her collaborative research with Indigenous people in Labrador, taught in the PhD summer school at the International Congress on Circumpolar Health in Finland, and gave many other seminars and workshops throughout Canada. Julie is also an active member of the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) where she has spent the last five years as an advocate and activist for Indigenous content, engagement, and collaboration between early career scientists and the Indigenous people who live in the north.

Since there are still disproportionally low numbers of Inuk scholars, Julie is committed to encouraging more people from the North to become actively engaged in academia and to use their Indigenous voices to bring change to the educational systems throughout the country.

  • Up close and personal: Resurgence through Resiliency

    By reflecting on her own personal journey, Julie captivates audiences with stories of resiliency and perseverance as she worked diligently to overcome many obstacles. Her passion and dedication are surpassed only by her commitment to carrying on the work of her ancestors. A common phrase being seen on social media is ‘be the person you needed when you were younger’ which has always resonated with Julie. Through her academic pursuits to understand the practical implications of national policy on indigenous communities, Julie learned something far more valuable. That is, to be authentic.

    From Principles to Practice: Relational Reconciliation

    In this session, Julie draws on nearly two decades of working, studying, and volunteering in Indigenous communities in Canada. Her genuine approach to relationship building has become the cornerstone to her personal and professional life and it is this relational component that has garnered international attention. The world is waking up to the injustices that Indigenous people face and people are eager to learn how to meaningful engage with Indigenous populations. Based on the underlying principles of respect, relevance, reciprocity, and responsibility, Julie shares stories from her work and offers tangible ideas for how audiences can build and maintain relationships with Indigenous people.

    The Road Less Traveled: Finding yourself and Leading the way

    They say that people are born natural leaders and this certainly fits with Julie. She has been actively involved in leadership roles since childhood where she would lead peers in a variety of activities. Over time, she has honed in on these skills and practices a gentle leadership whereby individuals on the team are active and involved. Julie’s natural ability to engage audiences and find people’s passions leaves her well positioned to lead teams in a variety of ways. Her guidance comes from the symbolism in the Inukshuk where she attributes much of her success to organic growth. The principle-based approach she takes is transferable and can be modified to suit nearly all environments.

  • Indigenous Foundations

    In this beginner workshop, Julie introduces participants to the very basics about Indigenous people in Canada. She personalizes each workshop to the province/territory and city that she works in to include local and relevant content. This workshop is suitable for nearly all groups including governments, non-profits, educators, community members, and others. Julie’s personalized approach using participatory methods leave audiences with practical and tangible suggestions they can use in their lives and work after they leave.

    Reconciliation through relationships

    In this more advanced workshop (for those who already have a basic understanding of Indigenous people and Indigenous affairs), Julie provides participants with examples from across Canada on how to meaningfully engage Indigenous people in various ways (in research, policy, programs, front-line service, etc) in co-learning models where mutual interests are discussed.

  • “I have seen Julie speaking in communities, governments, and academic settings with ease. She relates well to people and has an amazing ability to read the room and be able to adapt her talk as required based on the energy and understanding within the audience. She is an exceptional Indigenous scholar whose research is known throughout Canada and around the world. Her dynamic presence in a room is exceptional”

    - Dr. Melissa Carroll, Carroll Consulting

    “Julie has an exemplary history in both her leadership and academic achievement. She constantly demonstrates an open mind, a genuine character and a sincere desire to give back. She has already made many significant contributions and will undoubtedly continue to do so throughout her career. Julie has had experience in report writing for community-based organizations and has been commended by Aboriginal community leaders for her sensitivity in research and her ability to provide feedback to the community participants of research in a meaningful and accessible way. Likewise, she is increasingly invited around the world to discuss research methods and ethics for research involving Indigenous people based on her substantial portfolio to date.”

    - Mr. Todd Russell, NunatuKavut

    “Julie delivered a memorable Keynote Presentation “When Two Worlds Collide: Ethical Quirks and Quandaries in Research Involving Indigenous People”, which not only set the tone to the whole conference, but also served as a foundation for the discussion of domestic and transnational aspects in the governance of knowledge production. Both visual and academic components of the presentation were equally impressive and helped to elevate the level of the conference and its global academic and regulatory impact. Julie’s formal and informal contribution to this academic event was twice as important – not only she has generously shared her in-depth knowledge of the governance of research involving indigenous peoples in Canada, but also served as an ambassador of indigenous peoples, their unique perspective and their socio- cultural expertise in the field of traditional and modern systems of knowledge, thus actively promoting an indigenous viewpoint and enriching Canada’s approach to research and education.”

    - Igor Gontcharov, York University

    “Julie Bull is a Vanier Scholar who is sincerely committed and dedicated to community-based research and policy development for aboriginal people by working closely with aboriginal people. As an emerging leader in Aboriginal health research, Julie is well known and respected from her peers in communities and colleagues within universities”

    - Dr. Janet Smylie

    “In terms of communication skills, Julie demonstrates success with academic writing and oral conference presentations.  Moreover, she has demonstrated the ability to communicate with clarity to diverse non-academic audiences.  She has had experience in report writing for community-based organizations and has been commended by Aboriginal community leaders for her sensitivity in research and her ability to provide feedback to the community participants of research.”

    - Dr. Fern Brunger, Health Research Ethics Board

    “An avid scholar, Julie has overcome adversity and obstacles, broken barriers, and challenges the status quo where she sees social injustice. Julie does not allow her professional and academic successes to change her commitment and dedication to her community. She has not lost sight of her roots and continues to inspire youth, adults, and elders to fully embrace their culture. Julie’s work highlights the importance of true partnerships and her research demeanor continues to show how community based research can and should be conducted.”

    - Jamie Snook, Mayor, Happy Valley-Goose Bay

Julie Bull is an of mixed Inuit descent and is a member of NunatuKavut, Labrador. Julie teaches in the Aboriginal Studies Program at the University of Victoria and is an invited lecturer and speaker at many events throughout Canada and around the world. She is also an event manager for Diverse (Indigenous) Talents where she works with Scott Ward and Dakota House, and is an ethics policy consultant for the Native Council of Prince Edward Island. Her academic background is interdisciplinary with a specific focus on research methods and ethics for research involving Indigenous people. Among Julie’s many awards and accolades are Canada’s most prestigious doctoral award, the Vanier Graduate Scholarship and the National Aboriginal Role Model Award from the National Aboriginal Health Organization in recognition of her leadership within Indigenous grassroots communities. She also received the Jens Peder Hanson Memorial Fellowship Award, given to outstanding researchers in the circumpolar north.

Julie is active in both academic and grassroots Indigenous initiatives and sits on national committees working in the area of Aboriginal health research and research ethics, such as the Secretariat on Responsible Conduct of Research. She remains connected to her home community in Labrador by sitting on the NunatuKavut Community Council Research Advisory Committee and continuing to facilitate relationships between that community and academic researchers. She is also a mentor in the Indigenous Women in Community Leadership through the Coady International Institute at St. FX University.

In 2015, Julie was a keynote speaker at International Research Ethics conference in New Zealand, sat on a planning committee for an International conference in Japan where she also presented her collaborative research with Indigenous people in Labrador, taught in the PhD summer school at the International Congress on Circumpolar Health in Finland, and gave many other seminars and workshops throughout Canada. Julie is also an active member of the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) where she has spent the last five years as an advocate and activist for Indigenous content, engagement, and collaboration between early career scientists and the Indigenous people who live in the north.

Since there are still disproportionally low numbers of Inuk scholars, Julie is committed to encouraging more people from the North to become actively engaged in academia and to use their Indigenous voices to bring change to the educational systems throughout the country.

Speaker Summary

Location: Canada

Language: English

Website: Click Here

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