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Ernie Louttit Honesty + Integrity + Leadership

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Book Speaker

“Choosing the Hill”

Award winning Author of "Indian Ernie: Perspectives on Leadership and Policing" and "More Indian Ernie: Insights from the Streets", Louttit gives an honest and insightful look into his world. Ernie blows the lid off of taboo topics around policing, racism, and violence. Sharing his stories, some dark, and some humourous, with the goal of inspiring leadership in each and every one of us.

Ernie Louttit was born in Northern Ontario. A member of the Missanabie Cree First Nation raised off reserve in Oba, Ontario a small village 600 miles north of Toronto. Ernie attended a one room school until grade 8 and then was boarded out in a town further north for high school. As a result he left school at 15 to work on the Canadian National Railway. In 1978 at 17 he joined the Canadian Armed Forces serving 5 years in the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry attaining the rank of Master Corporal. Ernie changed trades to become a Military Policeman and served until 1987. 

In 1987 he joined the Saskatoon Police. Ernie was the third native police officer in the force’s history. He spent nearly his entire career as a uniformed patrol officer and eventually was promoted to Sergeant.

Ernie Louttit came to Saskatoon at the beginning of a period of change both in policing and for First Nations. Issues of crime, violence and racist attitudes going both ways dominated most of his career. Through all of this he tried to keep it all in perspective realizing so many of the things happening were the residual effects of past wrongs and injustices. In October 2013 he retired and wrote a book about his experiences called “Indian Ernie: Perspectives on Leadership and Policing”.

In April 2015 Ernie’s first book was awarded the Rasmussen, Rasmussen, and Charowsky Aboriginal People’s writing award. His second book "More Indian Ernie: Insights from the Streets" was released in July 2015.

Since the books were released Ernie has been speaking all over Western Canada. His themes of strong leadership, tolerance and empathy have been well received. Ernie believes this is the best time to be a First Nations person in Canada especially for our youth. We are all capable of being leaders. Ernie uses a variety of stories, some are dark cautionary tales and others are humorous, to show that anyone can make a difference.

  • Leadership

    Ernie has an incredibly diverse Leadership toolkit! He can address multiple facets of this topic including the woes of "Negative Leadership," and "Head in the Sand Leadership" and the positive impacts of "Empowering Leadership," "Passionate Leadership," and "Socially Responsible Leadership".  Ernie will bring invaluable awareness and understanding to many concepts including:

    • Everyone leads: See yourself as a leader
    • Avoid the leadership bumps: The power of what you say
    • Be socially responsible: Everyone sees what you do not what you say
    • Find the inspiration: Everyone remembers passionate teachers and leaders - be one!
    • Knowing each other: Police and the Community share the leadership responsibility
    • Seeing beyond what you see day to day: Adopting the invisible people
    • "Lighting up violence": Dealing with violence as a leader and as an individual (for Medical, Corrections, Police, and Mental health professionals)

    Strength Through Self-Reliance

    Success beckons success!  Ernie discusses how important it is to know your job, and how every step forward is momentum for the next.  His personal experiences will show how relying on yourself can move you faster towards your dreams, and that finishing what you started is key to getting to where you want to go.  

    Through the Eyes of an Indigenous Law Enforcement Officer

    It’s no secret that Law Enforcement has had a long history of struggling to understand and deal with indigenous people. Ernie shares his personal journey of handling racism and violence on both sides of the law. While successfully breaking down the major roadblocks to understanding and empathy, Louttit discusses how as an Indigenous man he had never wanted a hand up, he just didn’t want anyone standing in his way, and how too often he had to "choose the hill" he wanted to die on.

  • "Indian Ernie: Perspectives on Leadership and Policing"

    "In 1987, Louttit became only the third Native officer to serve in a city with a significant Aboriginal population. Drawing from his service as a veteran officer, Louttit – Indian Ernie as he came to be known on the streets – tells tales of conflict and violence, but most vividly, the realities of marginalized people. Demonstrating a passion for his community, he argues empathy can be the greatest tool in an officer's hands. He is passionate about policing, especially with society's less fortunate, and offers insights into addressing the issues marginalized people face."

    "More Indian Ernie: Insights from the Streets"

    "Retired Police Sergeant Ernie Louttit takes you back to the streets of Saskatoon in his second book, a street cop’s view of the realities of dealing with prostitutes, street gangs, drunk drivers, and other offenders. He gives people who are rarely exposed to crime a view of what policing “at the sharp end” is like, while acknowledging the struggles of those who are forced by circumstance to live in high-crime areas. The first point of contact for persons with mental illness and addictions is often the police, and Louttit highlights how changes in handling these individuals must occur."

  • "Your talks are always so motivational, interesting and inspiring."

    - Lillian Denton, SIGA

    "I was very touched by Ernie Louttit’s presentation and message of approaching our most vulnerable population with compassion and free of ego, as well as the personalized messages in the books. It is so important to be reminded of hoe there are those out there who value the gentle, empathetic approach to our students, and to students/adults in general."

    – Alina Floch, Sask. Teachers

    "Today is the international Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. To celebrate I attended a breakfast put on by the Saskatoon Police Service where the keynote speech was given by my friend Ernie Louttit. The thing that resonated with me the most was the comment that we all want the same things no matter who we are and it's our stories that connect us together."

    - Jason Der - March 2015

    "Before this day slips away on me; I would just like to send a quick email to once again thank you for speaking to our wonderful little town of Birch Hills last evening. You were definitely a crowd pleaser Ernie, as I have never witnessed a spontaneous standing ovation, in the last 20 years, as you received last night. Congratulations on a job well done."

    - Val Quayle, Birch Hills Library Gala Board member - April 2016

    "Outstanding presentation Ernie. I love that term “leadership bump."

    – Jason Der, Vandesta Leadership on Tap

  • Awards/Highlights

    • Rasmussen, Rasmussen & Charowsky Aboriginal Peoples’ Writing Award [Indian Ernie], April 2015.
  • Clients

    • Simon Fraser University Aboriginal Students association- Vancouver
    • Saskatchewan Police College -Regina
    • Alberta RCMP Aboriginal Officers Conference –Edmonton
    • Probus (retired Professionals) - Saskatoon
    • Buffalo River Dene First Nation
    • Witchekan Lake First Nation
    • Saskatchewan Court of Queen’s Bench Judges Conference –Saskatoon
    • Credit Union Lenders Association of Alberta Conference- Red Deer
    • Saskatchewan Indian Gaming Authority (SIGA) Management Symposium- Saskatoon
    • Canadian Association of Human Rights Associations (CASHRA) conference- Saskatoon
    • Aboriginal Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) Conference- Prince Albert
    • Prince Albert Friendship Inn Conference- Prince Albert
    • Gabriel Dumont Institute –Saskatoon
    • Saskatchewan Teachers Convention (2015) –Saskatoon
    • Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Sciences and Technology (SIAST) Woodland Campus - Prince Albert
    • Saskatchewan Editors Annual Meeting –Saskatoon
    • Saskatchewan Book Awards- Regina –Saskatoon
    • Dakota Dunes Casino General Assembly (SIGA) – Whitecap First Nation
    • Saskatchewan Crown Prosecutor’s Conference – Moose Jaw
    • Department of Justice (Saskatchewan Office) National teleconference
    • Saskatchewan Aboriginal Government Employees Conference- Regina
    • Peter Ballantyne First Nation Family Wellness Conference – Prince Albert
    • First Nations University of Canada – both Regina and Prince Albert Campuses
    • Canadian Federation of University Women AGM – Saskatoon
    • University of Saskatchewan Violence and Aggression Seminar (2016) – Saskatoon
    • Northern Justice Symposium – Prince Albert
    • Saskatchewan Association of Community Educators Conference – Saskatoon
    • SIGA Central Office Assembly- Saskatoon
    • Saskatchewan Polytechnic Institutes - both Saskatoon and Prince Albert campuses
    • Canadian Broadcasting Corporation - Definitely Not the Opera – Saskatoon
    • Festival of Words – Moose Jaw
    • Birch Hills Library Fundraiser- Birch Hills, SK
    • Saskatoon Public Library
    • Meadow Lake Public Library
    • The Hindu Temple of Saskatoon
    • Elimination of Racism Annual Breakfast – Saskatoon
    • Global Gathering Place – Saskatoon
    • Walter Murray Collegiate – Saskatoon
    • Prince Albert Collegiate – Prince Albert
    • Carpenter High School – Meadow Lake
    • Mount Royal Collegiate – Saskatoon
    • St Joseph’s High School - Saskatoon

Ernie Louttit was born in Northern Ontario. A member of the Missanabie Cree First Nation raised off reserve in Oba, Ontario a small village 600 miles north of Toronto. Ernie attended a one room school until grade 8 and then was boarded out in a town further north for high school. As a result he left school at 15 to work on the Canadian National Railway. In 1978 at 17 he joined the Canadian Armed Forces serving 5 years in the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry attaining the rank of Master Corporal. Ernie changed trades to become a Military Policeman and served until 1987. 

In 1987 he joined the Saskatoon Police. Ernie was the third native police officer in the force’s history. He spent nearly his entire career as a uniformed patrol officer and eventually was promoted to Sergeant.

Ernie Louttit came to Saskatoon at the beginning of a period of change both in policing and for First Nations. Issues of crime, violence and racist attitudes going both ways dominated most of his career. Through all of this he tried to keep it all in perspective realizing so many of the things happening were the residual effects of past wrongs and injustices. In October 2013 he retired and wrote a book about his experiences called “Indian Ernie: Perspectives on Leadership and Policing”.

In April 2015 Ernie’s first book was awarded the Rasmussen, Rasmussen, and Charowsky Aboriginal People’s writing award. His second book "More Indian Ernie: Insights from the Streets" was released in July 2015.

Since the books were released Ernie has been speaking all over Western Canada. His themes of strong leadership, tolerance and empathy have been well received. Ernie believes this is the best time to be a First Nations person in Canada especially for our youth. We are all capable of being leaders. Ernie uses a variety of stories, some are dark cautionary tales and others are humorous, to show that anyone can make a difference.

Speaker Summary

Location: Canada

Language: English

Website: Click Here

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